Heart of Oneness review

This reflective ‘little book of connection’ enables readers to stand back from the violent images portrayed on our screens every day and the realisation that our divided world is full of poverty, inequality and injustice. And the same time, heroic acts of altruism are also going on, reflecting the paradoxical nature of the human condition and our difficulties in living together. The author...
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Reviews for Heart of Oneness

Friends Journal, reviewed by William Shetter on April 1, 2018 This meditation by a British Quaker may be modest in size, but the subject it addresses is a dauntingly ambitious one; in fact it’s one that could risk a bit of superficiality: the paradox of a world of incredible diversity in creative tension with a mutual interconnectedness. The author wisely does not attempt a head-on tackle of...
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Emancipation of B review

A book which doesn’t finish after the last page It doesn’t. You keep thinking about it, and it would be a good one for Reading Groups. The ending is not satisfactory, or is it? Clearly the author intends it to be so for B. Interesting for practitioners of Buddhism. (crispy on...
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A little book of unknowing

Anne Stamper | The Julian Meetings magazine, April 2017 issue Jennifer Kavanagh is a Quaker and a retreat leader. In this little book she writes from her own experience, but also draws on the works of well-known spiritual writers, Julian of Norwich, the author of The Cloud of Unknowing, and Evelyn Underhill to mention a few. She points out that Homo sapiens means ‘wise man’ not...
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The Emancipation of B review (Magnet magazine)

As a child, B had two conflicting dreams; one to be a knight defending the vulnerable; the other to be a hermit living in complete solitude. Something of a social misfit, B manages to engineer a cell of sorts from which he retreats from urban life, discovering a kind of freedom he hadn’t anticipated. Cut off from demands of daily living, B desires to explore ‘a different dimension’. Using...
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A little book of unknowing review (Magnet magazine)

If you have not read the Quaker writer, Jennifer Kavanagh, then you must. In all her previous books she displays such wisdom and spiritual insight and ‘A little book of Unknowing’ is no exception. Literally a little book of only 56 pages it is easily read, but don’t be put off by the size in the thought that it cannot contain much – it is full of insightful gems. Kavanagh will always push...
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